A Guide to Psychology and its Practice -- welcome to 
                     the «Questions and Answers» page. Click on the image to go to a general Introduction 
                     with a complete Subject Index to this entire website.

Questions
and Answers

 

Website Menus

Page Contents: When you want your psychotherapist to hug you.                    

 

I want more than anything for my therapist to hug me because it hurts so much sometimes when we talk. Would that be inappropriate?

 
There is nothing inappropriate with wanting a hug from your psychotherapist. The problems begin when you start to believe that a hug will somehow make your psychotherapy better.

A psychotherapist’s job is to help you encounter and verbalize the unspoken emotional pain that you have been avoiding all your life. Hugging your psychotherapist can give the illusion of some momentary relief, but relief is not healing. A hug, under these circumstances, will only “short-circuit” the intensity of the healing process. Healing comes only from facing the pain directly and honestly and then putting it into words. Only when you want healing more than anything else—more even than a hug—will you find healing.

Once you have encountered your emotional pain and understood it, then you will have the capacity for emotionally genuine relationships, and you can give and receive all the hugs you want from friends and relatives.

 


 Back to the list of questions

 


No advertising—no sponsor—just the simple truth . . .

If this website has helped you, then
please help support this website



FOR THE SAKE OF TRUTH this website about the practice of Clinical Psychology does not accept any advertising.

Therefore, if my work has been informative and helpful to you, please send a donation in appreciation, even if it’s only a few dollars, to help offset my costs in making this website available to everyone without advertising.

 
Gratitude is joy to the heart!

 


Raymond Lloyd Richmond, Ph.D.
San Francisco
 
Credentials
 
Contact Me


 


 

A Guide to Psychology and its Practice

www.GuideToPsychology.com

 

Copyright © 1997-2015 Raymond Lloyd Richmond, Ph.D. All rights reserved.
San Francisco

 

All material on this website is copyrighted. You may copy or print selections for your private, personal use only.
Any other reproduction or distribution without my permission is prohibited.

 

 
Donate

No advertising and no sponsor—just the simple truth.